Psalm 12: False Words Vs. Faithful Words

Each Wednesday night at Arapahoe Road Baptist Church, we go over a Psalm to help us in our worship, prayer, and mission here at ARBC.  Last night, we covered Psalm 12.  Take time to read through this, and then may these notes help fuel our prayer time with our Father through the Son! 

1. The profusion of faithless words may discourage the believer (Psalm 12:1-4).

Like Elijah, David felt he was abandoned (likely when Saul was persecuting him and murdering the priests at Nob-1 Samuel 22:6-23). The lies, the flattery, the double heartedness, and the boasts were quite loud in David’s ear. These words served as the worst type of weapons. Their words showed how they felt they were master over their own hearts and over all they surveyed. Jesus never entrusted himself to others, because regardless of what they said about their trust in him, he knew their heart (John 2:23-25).

2. The purity of God’s faithful words may encourage the believer, regardless of circumstances (Psalm 12:5-6).

The words of the faithless are contaminated with their own pride and fallenness and thus cannot be fully trusted. Our words can leverage and manipulate others in various degrees toward our own desires. Thus, the poor and needy suffer under their rule. God arises to secure those in the most need. And when God says He will do something, we are secure in knowing that the purity of His words (His Word!) will come through. They have been tried, refined, and found faithful and true. God is One who not only does not lie but cannot lie (Titus 1:2).

Who are some in our culture whose words you wish you could trust?

3. The protection of God’s word will guard us—even if we don’t understand them all.

Do we wonder if God will keep His promises? Do we understand all that God has written? J.C. Ryle, in the midst of attacks against the Word of God by so-called intellectual elites of his day, said, “Give me the plenary, verbal theory of biblical inspiration with all its difficulties, rather than doubt. I will accept the difficulties and humbly wait for their solution. But while I wait, I am standing on the rock.”

So be it, Lord!

MAGNIFY:

The only one who can help, deliver, and save is the One whose words are pure, tried, refined, and found perfect in all they say. Our Baptist Faith & Message (2000) says, “It is a perfect treasure of divine instruction. It has God for its author, salvation for its end, and truth, without any mixture of error, for its matter. Therefore, all Scripture is totally true and trustworthy.” Stay in the Word, absorb it, memorize it, meditate upon it—these are the only Words that we can totally trust.

MATURE

You cannot magnify Christ without maturing in His Word. Maturing in Christ means we understand and trust the promises of God over the profusion of words that fly at us each day. When we are young in the faith, every opponent of the Word would leave us in knots—and we would obsess and even debate them until we ‘won.’ As we grow in Christ, we are more confident in His Word and His will and the opponents’ arrows do not inflict their damage. We know them for who they are, and it fuels our prayer life for their souls.

MINISTER

Do we know of those who are ‘poor,’ ‘needy,’ disenfranchised, or oppressed that could use some faithful words from the faithful Word rather than from the powers-that-be who tend to use words for their own political or personal gain? Jesus told us that the sparrow doesn’t fall to the ground without him knowing it. Paul shows us that those who are weak, lowly, and foolish to the world are not outside of the saving work of Christ. Do we know of any who need this ministry?

MOBILIZE

Centennial to the corners of creation are oppressed by unfaithful leaders who spout unfaithful words—yet they look to these leaders for safety and security. Deep down, they feel trapped. Christ came as the faithful Word of God to show them One who will not leverage His Word to their detriment. His Word brings to repentance and holiness.

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